Mr Ortin Zakarian

He is sometimes listed as “Artun Zakarian” or “Artin Zakarian”.

Mr Harry Anderson was born in Scarborough, Yorkshire on 20 October 1864, and went to the United States in his youth.

In 1912, Mr Anderson was returning to his home in New York City after a business and pleasure trip to England. He was a Wall Street stockbroker and was married to the former Flora Makley, daughter of John F. and Anna E. Makley. They lived on Manhattan’s Upper West Side. The Andersons had no children. Mrs Anderson did not make the trip with her husband and had remained in New York.

Mr Anderson boarded the Titanic in Southampton (ticket number 19952, £26 11s) and occupied cabin E-12 . He left the Titanic in Lifeboat 3 which was one of the first boats to leave.

Back in New York, Mr Anderson was commodore of the yacht division of the New York Athletic Club. In his later years, he was a member of the Larchmont Yacht Club, the same club in which fellow survivor, Frederick Hoyt , was also a member.

Harry Anderson’s wife Florence Makley Anderson died on 7 December 1937. At the time of his own death in New York on 23 November 1951, at the age of 87, he left no surviving relatives in the United States.

Harry Anderson and his wife were both buried at Woodlawn Cemetery in New York City.

Mr Harry Anderson was born in Scarborough, Yorkshire on 20 October 1864, and went to the United States in his youth.

In 1912, Mr Anderson was returning to his home in New York City after a business and pleasure trip to England. He was a Wall Street stockbroker and was married to the former Flora Makley, daughter of John F. and Anna E. Makley. They lived on Manhattan’s Upper West Side. The Andersons had no children. Mrs Anderson did not make the trip with her husband and had remained in New York.

Mr Anderson boarded the Titanic in Southampton (ticket number 19952, £26 11s) and occupied cabin E-12 . He left the Titanic in Lifeboat 3 which was one of the first boats to leave.

Back in New York, Mr Anderson was commodore of the yacht division of the New York Athletic Club. In his later years, he was a member of the Larchmont Yacht Club, the same club in which fellow survivor, Frederick Hoyt , was also a member.

Harry Anderson’s wife Florence Makley Anderson died on 7 December 1937. At the time of his own death in New York on 23 November 1951, at the age of 87, he left no surviving relatives in the United States.

Harry Anderson and his wife were both buried at Woodlawn Cemetery in New York City.

Mr George Wright is believed to have been born in Tufts Cove, Nova Scotia, on 26 October 1849. (There is some confusion about the exact date in the records). He was a farmer’s son, but during a visit to the U.S. Centennial Exhibition in Philadelphia in 1876, he got the idea of compiling an international business directory, and became a successful printer before he was 30. He made a fortune publishing Wrights World Business Directories, which became an indispensable guide to the corporate world on three continents.

He was a well travelled, rich, but private individual with a social conscience. Wright was committed to better housing for the working poor, and when he went into the building construction business, he created a subdivision in Halifax which was one of the first anywhere to integrate housing for the rich and poor. His own house at 989 Young Ave, and two of his public buildings, The Marble Wright Building (1672 Barrington St.) and The Saint Paul Building, (1684 Barrington St.) still stand in downtown Halifax.

Wright sailed to Europe on the Empress of Ireland in the autumn of 1911, and was in Paris when he learned of Titanic’s maiden voyage. He apparently booked passage at the last minute; his name does not appear on the list of ship’s passengers distributed during the voyage. He paid £26 for his ticket, but there is no record of which cabin he was assigned, but it was a single berth cabin, probably on E Deck where many of the commercial travellers were booked.

No one recalls seeing Wright on the voyage. He kept to himself, and friends speculate that because he was a heavy sleeper he probably went to bed on the evening of April 14 and possibly never woke up. His body, if recovered, was never identified.

Mr George Wright is believed to have been born in Tufts Cove, Nova Scotia, on 26 October 1849. (There is some confusion about the exact date in the records). He was a farmer’s son, but during a visit to the U.S. Centennial Exhibition in Philadelphia in 1876, he got the idea of compiling an international business directory, and became a successful printer before he was 30. He made a fortune publishing Wrights World Business Directories, which became an indispensable guide to the corporate world on three continents.

He was a well travelled, rich, but private individual with a social conscience. Wright was committed to better housing for the working poor, and when he went into the building construction business, he created a subdivision in Halifax which was one of the first anywhere to integrate housing for the rich and poor. His own house at 989 Young Ave, and two of his public buildings, The Marble Wright Building (1672 Barrington St.) and The Saint Paul Building, (1684 Barrington St.) still stand in downtown Halifax.

Wright sailed to Europe on the Empress of Ireland in the autumn of 1911, and was in Paris when he learned of Titanic’s maiden voyage. He apparently booked passage at the last minute; his name does not appear on the list of ship’s passengers distributed during the voyage. He paid £26 for his ticket, but there is no record of which cabin he was assigned, but it was a single berth cabin, probably on E Deck where many of the commercial travellers were booked.

No one recalls seeing Wright on the voyage. He kept to himself, and friends speculate that because he was a heavy sleeper he probably went to bed on the evening of April 14 and possibly never woke up. His body, if recovered, was never identified.

Sig. Battista Antonio (Baptiste) Allaria, 22, was born in Molini di Triora, Provincia di Imperia, Italy on 31 May 1889, the son of Antonio and Maria Anna Caldani. When he signed-on to the Titanic, on 6 April 1912, he gave his address as 9 Orchard Place, (Southampton). His last ship had been the Olympic. Allaria died in the sinking, his body was later recovered by the cable-ship MacKay Bennett (#221) and was buried at Fairview Cemetery, Halifax, Nova Scotia, on 6 May 1912.

Sig. Battista Antonio (Baptiste) Allaria, 22, was born in Molini di Triora, Provincia di Imperia, Italy on 31 May 1889, the son of Antonio and Maria Anna Caldani. When he signed-on to the Titanic, on 6 April 1912, he gave his address as 9 Orchard Place, (Southampton). His last ship had been the Olympic. Allaria died in the sinking, his body was later recovered by the cable-ship MacKay Bennett (#221) and was buried at Fairview Cemetery, Halifax, Nova Scotia, on 6 May 1912.

Mr Tyrell William Cavendish, 36, of London, England.

Mr Cavendish boarded the Titanic at Southampton with his wife Julia Florence Cavendish and her maid Nellie Barber. They travelled as first class passengers and occupied cabin C-46.

Mrs Cavendish and Ms Barber were rescued in lifeboat 6 but Mr Cavendish died, his body was later recovered by the MacKay Bennett and his body was sent to Mrs Cavandish on 3 May 1912, under the care of Simpson, Crawford & Co.

Mr Tyrell William Cavendish, 36, of London, England.

Mr Cavendish boarded the Titanic at Southampton with his wife Julia Florence Cavendish and her maid Nellie Barber. They travelled as first class passengers and occupied cabin C-46.

Mrs Cavendish and Ms Barber were rescued in lifeboat 6 but Mr Cavendish died, his body was later recovered by the MacKay Bennett and his body was sent to Mrs Cavandish on 3 May 1912, under the care of Simpson, Crawford & Co.